The Green Borscht

 
- Miliku, want some green BORSCHT?” my dear grannie Rivka asked, smiling, expecting an affirmative answer. In Sokyriany, a small district town in Chernovitskaya Oblast, the long-awaited Summer was in full bloom, greening with plots of scallions, long-tailed garlic, merry dills and parsleys… As soon as I heard grannie’s enticing offer, I would dash headlong into the garden situated leisurely in around our house, scattering the groups of fluffy yellow chicks in the spacious yard as I ran. There, next to the plum, apricot, apple, and pear trees, sat appetizing patches of sour sorrel. At first, I was even afraid to confuse their large, tenderly greening leaves with the dusty burdocks that would grow out to enormous proportions by summer’s end.
The summer promised to be a generous one. Brief but copious thunderstorms would rumble all around every few days, quickly filling the “Dizhkis” – what we called in our Romainian-Ukrainian-Jewish-Russian Sokyrianese hodgepodge the many wooden barrels placed at the downspouts around our large, ten-room house that had been built back in the day by my great-grandfather Avrum. At the very first thunderclaps, my grandmas Riva and Rosa would dash in a panic to chase all the chickens, geese, turkeys, and other livestock into the large, dark henhouse. Then, squeezing against each other and yelping after each flash of lightning or thunderclap, they would pray desperately. Evidently the prayers were very effective, because all was well in our household, whereas each storm would bring news from the town about a burned-down house or an unfortunate shepherd doomed by a lightning strike.
Meanwhile, the garden also sprouted vigorously growing cucumbers, always trying to hide under a salutary leaf from my keen eyes, and festive potatoes, waving cheerfully with their white and lilaceous flowers, and numerous small greens that burst through the ground like mad from the copious rains, warm weather, and the skilled hands of my relations… The front of the house was adorned by another magical garden, dressed in enormous, fragrant Lilac, a large Rose bush, whose petals were used every year to make Magical jam, and even blue bell-flowers, modest forget-me-nots, and aristocratic, precious irises, born in ancient times from the iridescent garments of the goddess Iris and oftentimes called simply “roosters…” One time, in the course of his countless agricultural experiments, my father managed to disrupt this small kingdom of beauty by planting two walnut trees. A brick had been placed beneath the trunk of one of these during planting, so as to force the roots to grow in the upper, most fertile layers of soil. And, o Miracle! Every year, the fruit of this walnut tree turned out simply enormous, as big as an apple. Long after moving to Tiraspol, we would tearfully beg our friends and relatives to pass along, for Memory’s sake, one or two of these heroic nuts that were also remarkably delicious. Having since worked with plants for a long time at the Academy of Sciences, I can understand perfectly the Miracle that was lost. These nuts could have become the foundation of unheard-of varieties of most enormous, most delicious, and never spoiling nuts with light, perfectly formed shells… Alas! But the Wonderful house of my Childhood, along with its incredible nuts, has been razed and paved over…
Between our house and the neighbors’ was yet another chain of majestic, ancient walnut trees. They would knock down the nuts with tall poles that, to me, looked infinitely long. The nuts would rain down from the tree like hail, threatening to whack a heedless boy most painfully in the brow. Despite the fact that the trunks of the trees were on “our” side of the low stone barrier, fashioned from hefty boulders, there would be quite a quarrel every year regarding the nuts that fell on the neighbors’ side. After a hot-tempered division of the harvest, my grandmas would bake an immense walnut pie of peace and head over to the neighbors’ for the whole evening to knock back tea and carry on lengthy, unhurried discussions about the changing weather, the prospects of harvest, the escapades of some or another person of loose morals, and the endless – ever-present after that horrible War – concern for the Fate of their children, grandchildren, and other loved ones! About our Future, mine and yours…
Since then, a lot of water has flowed under the bridge, but I still love green BORSCHT, no matter how hard it is to find sorrel in Toronto, Moscow, or in Israel. It’s not just that it’s oh-so tasty… You dip a wooden spoon straight in the pot, close your eyes in satisfaction, and it almost seems as if…

ЗЕЛЁНЫЙ БОРЩ...

      - Милик, зелёный БОРШТ, хочешь ?,- улыбаясь, спрашивала моя дорогая бабушка Ривка, заранее, ожидая утвердительный ответ. В Сокирянах, маленьком районном местечке Черновицкой области, уже вовсю разгоралось долгожданное Лето , ярко зеленея грядками молодого лука, хвостатого чеснока и весёлых  петрушек с укропами... Я же, только услышав заманчивое предложение бабушки, разгоняя во дворе стайки пушистых желтых цыплят, опрометью кидался в  огород, вольготно расположившийся в просторном дворе вокруг нашего дома. Там,  у сливовых, абрикосовых, яблочных и грушовых деревьев пристроились аппетитные лопушки кисленького щавеля. Первое время,  я даже даже боялся перепутать их нежно зеленеющие крупные листья с пыльными лопухами, разраставшимися к концу лета до гигантских размеров..
          Лето обещало быть щедрым. Каждые несколько дней вокруг грохотали скоротечные, но  обильные грозы, быстро наполнявшие " Дижкис", как на нашем Сокирянском румынско-украинско-еврейско-русском Суржике назывались многочисленные деревянные бочки, расставленные у водостоков , вокруг всего нашего большого десятикомнатного дома, построенного ещё моим прадедом Аврумом. При первых же раскатах грома, мои бабушки, Рива и Роза, панически бросались загонять кур, гусей, индюков и прочую живность в большой, тёмный курятник, а затем, прижимаясь к друг другу и вскрикивая после каждого сполоха молнии и удара грома, отчаянно молились . Молитвы, видимо , были очень эффективными, так как у нас все было хорошо, а в местечке после каждой очередной грозы  становилось известно то о сгоревших дотла домишках, то о гибели  от удара молнии очередного несчастного пастуха .
      Между тем, на огороде бурно подрастали и огурцы, непременно старавшиеся притаиться под спасительным листиком, скрывшись от моих зорких очей, и нарядная картошка, приветливо машущая своими белыми и светло-сиреневыми цветочками , и многочисленная мелкая зелень, прущая из земли  "как скаженная" , от обильных осадков, тёплой погоды и умелых рук моих близких... Переднюю часть дома украшал волшебный палисадник, густо наряженный не только благоухающими громадными зарослями Сирени, большим кустом Розы, из лепестков которой каждый год готовилось Волшебное варенье, но и голубеющими колокольчиками, скромными незабудками и аристократично-драгоценными  ирисами , родившимися , ещё в стародавние времена, из радужных одежд богини Ириды , и называемыми , зачастую, просто, петушками... Однажды, проводя бесчисленные сельскохозяйственные эксперименты, отец умудрился нарушить это небольшое царство красоты, посадив в палисаднике два маленьких ореха. Под ствол одного из них, при посадке, был установлен кирпич, дабы заставить развиваться корни в верхнем, самом плодородном слое. И , о Чудо! Плоды этого ореха урождались каждый год просто гигантскими, размером со среднее яблоко. Уже переехав в Тирасполь, мы , каждый раз,  слёзно просили знакомых и родственников передать нам на Память, хотя бы,  один-два богатырских ореха, которые, к тому же, были и удивительно вкусны. Проработав изрядно с растениями в Академии Наук, я прекрасно понимаю, какое Чудо было упущено . Эти плоды могли стать основой невиданных прежде сортов крупнейших, вкуснейших и никогда непортящихся орехов со светлыми, прекрасно выполненными и ароматными ядрами... Жаль! Но Прекрасный дом моего Детства, вместе с удивительными орехами , был снесён и закатан в асфальт...
           Между нашим и домом соседей располагалась ещё и длинная цепь старых величественных орехов.  Сбивали их длиннющими жердями, казавшихся мне просто бесконечными. Орехи градом валились с дерева, норовя больно-пребольно щелкнуть по лбу зазевавшегося мальчишку. Несмотря на то, что стволы деревьев располагались с " нашей" стороны невысокой каменной ограды, сложённой из увесистых валунов, каждый год разгорались нешуточные споры из-за орехов, попадавших на соседскую сторону. После азартной дележки урожая, мои бабушки пекли громадный ореховый торт " примирения", шли к соседям на целый вечер гонять чаи, вести долгие-предолгие неспешные беседы о переменчивой погоде, видах на урожай, похождениях одной-другой аморальной особы, и постоянном ,никуда не исчезающем после той страшной Войны, беспокойстве о Судьбе своих деток, внучат,близких! О нашем с Вами Будущем...

     С тех пор утекло немало воды, а я, по-прежнему, люблю зелёный БОРШТ, иногда с трудом находя  щавель в Торонто, Москве или Израиле. Он не только очень-очень вкусен..!   

     Черпанешь деревянной ложкой прямо из кастрюли, зажмуришь глаза от удовольствия  и , кажется, что...........
 


Рецензии